Posted in Craft of writing, Pitching your Novel, Writing Conferences

2018 Writers League of Texas Conference

The Focus is on Pitching your Book 

Wow, the 2018 Writers League of Texas Agents and Editors conference was a different kind of conference for me — not just workshops on the craft of writing, though that was included. The focus instead was on pitching to agents and editors. And the conference planners went out of their way to prepare us for pitching our books. They offered podcasts before the conference on pitching tips. The first general session is about how to successfully pitch. Immediately following that, we had a practice pitch time with other attendees.

Continue reading “2018 Writers League of Texas Conference”

Posted in Craft of writing, fiction, Writing, Writing exercises

Revision: Ways to Improve my Writing

REVISION 

Editing a paragraph from my book-in-progress illustrates the kind of work entailed in revision. This is the “line edit” kind of editorial work that I do on an ongoing process with my writing partners and for myself.  Continue reading “Revision: Ways to Improve my Writing”

Posted in Craft of writing, fiction, Travel Writing, Writing

Conduct Research for Scenes in Your Fiction

via How to Research a Location You Haven’t Actually Been To

This blog post above by fellow writer, Helena Fairfax, has been wonderfully helpful to me in writing my novel set in India and on a ship in the Pacific and Indian oceans.  As an example, I wrote a scene in the book of slaughtering a sea turtle for eating aboard ship after watching a YouTube by today’s Aboriginal Australians.

Read the scene below from my book in-progress, Salwar Kameez. I’ve added a few notes to the reader to be able to grasp who the characters are in the scene, because it is out of context for you.

SCENE from BOOK on Butchering a Sea Turtle  Continue reading “Conduct Research for Scenes in Your Fiction”

Posted in Craft of writing, fiction, Writing

Does my novel pass the Bechdel-Wallace test?

I just learned about the Bechdel test (or Bechdel-Wallace test, as Bechdel prefers to call it to credit her friend, Ms. Wallace) from Andrea Lundgren’s recent blog post. This test requires in fiction or movies that 1) two women be present and named 2) talk to one another 3) about something other than a man.  Continue reading “Does my novel pass the Bechdel-Wallace test?”